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Short Film Review: AS THEY CONTINUE TO FALL.

atctf-web-1In a day and age where having a camera gives just about anybody free reign to go out and make a short (or feature), it’s rare to see a film possess such skill, precision and cinematic quality as Nikhil Bhagat’s AS THEY CONTINUE TO FALL.

Written by SINISTER/DOCTOR STRANGE‘s C. Scott Cargill, the film goes for a gritty tone right from its opening shot, with a homeless man sorting through trash, looking for something to eat. The film’s Director of Photography, Noah Rosenthal, really sets an impressive look for the film, with a grittiness that at the same time really looks sort of beautiful, with dark blue and fiery orange serving as lighting (both coming off as the night sky and trash fires). Its ability to bring you in right away and make you wonder where the character of the homeless has been or is going, AS THEY CONTINUE TO FALL does a switch from reality to a supernatural tone when we see an angel perched on top of a building, looking out at the city sky and smoking a cigarette.

How the worldly angel is related to the man is a question that pops in your head right away, and when we see that the vagrant has been able to see angels since childhood and that they’ve only shown a dark side to the whole idea to him (while getting bullied because of his visions as a child, one angel calls him a pussy), it brings a pretty good feeling to you when the man walks to the roof of a building, drops his bags and pulls out a sword and rifle, ready to take out not only the perched angel, but any others who make the unfortunate mistake of coming around him.

Cargill’s writing is always interesting to me, with his ability to effortlessly bring the supernatural approach into a real world feeling and there isn’t a single moment in this short that feels like it doesn’t feel authentically REAL, even when angels are brought into the fold. With Cargill’s writing and Bhagat at the helm, AS THEY CONTINUE TO FALL isn’t only an entertaining short, but along with L. Gustavo Cooper’s THE HOME, is probably the best short film I’ve seen all year. It’s imaginative, well script and shot and really makes you want to see more, something a short film executed perfectly should do.

AS THEY CONTINUE TO FALL: